Writer’s magic, unexpected left turns, and my new friend Esther

September 15th, 2018

It happens every single time I write a book.

Writer’s magic.

Others call it serendipity, or “the universe” (whatever that’s supposed to mean), or coincidence, or any number of things. But for me, it’s always been — magic.

Here’s the way it works. I sit down and start to write. I’m a pantster, which means I fly by the seat of my pants. No outline, no bulletin boards with pictures of characters cut out of magazines, no charts or lists or anything like that which my plotter friends use. Sometimes I have a vague general idea of where the story might go, but as often as not, it takes a surprise left turn and goes somewhere else entirely.

I just love this process of discovery as I go along! I love all the unexpected twists and turns. It keeps things interesting. Plus, inevitably, the magic happens, which is exactly what occurred recently with the draft I’m working on at the moment. (It’s another Pumpkin Falls mystery, in case you’re wondering.) And this time, I caught it in the act — well, almost — which rarely happens. It’s hard to track exactly where ideas come from, but once in a while, eureka!

So I was writing along, minding my own business, and all of a sudden, this synchronized swimming element popped into the story, completely out of the blue (or so it seemed). My main character, Truly, is a swimmer, so the pool is always a part of her story, but whoa, where did this come from? And not just synchronized swimming in general, but specifically two nonagenarians (great word – a nonagenarian is someone in their 90s) named Zadie and Lenore who used to swim with Esther Williams in Hollywood!

Seriously — I kid you not, they just turned up on the page, all sassy and bursting with life. No way was I going to shut the door on the two of THEM. They were pure magic.

Writer’s magic.

So into the story they’ve swum, and I am spending my evenings researching Esther Williams and watching her movies.

Now I haven’t watched an Esther Williams movie since I was in middle school, and happened to stumble upon one when I was channel surfing on a Saturday afternoon with nothing else to do. THAT’S A LONG TIME AGO! What on earth had made me think of her, and those fabulous over-the-top Busby Berkeley choreographed water ballet sequences? Dozens of swimmers! Fountains and flames! Live music! And Esther herself, with her sequins and shimmer, her girl-next-door smile, her perfectly coiffed hair and perfect makeup, which no amount of water could ever dislodge!

I had no idea.

But I’ve learned not to question these magic moments when they occur, and I’ve been having enormous fun immersing myself (pardon the pun) in Esther’s watery world, and finding ways to bring elements of it into my new book.

 

That’s a scene from Million Dollar Mermaid. Isn’t it fabulous? And isn’t Esther amazing? She was a real athlete, a champion swimmer who would very likely have been an Olympian but World War II interfered, and she ended up in Hollywood instead. She makes those stunts look easy, but they aren’t. Not at all.

Meanwhile, last weekend I went to see the new movie Crazy Rich Asians for the second time, because I liked it so much the first time I saw it, weeks ago right after it came out.

And suddenly there it was, onscreen, the source of this particular moment of writer’s magic. Just a flash of a scene at the very end, of synchronized swimmers performing at an over-the-top celebration.

Aha, I thought. THAT’S where I got the idea!

Knowing where and when the seed was planted took some of the mystery out of it, but none of the magic. Because the magic wasn’t done with me yet. It turns out that my young niece, without knowing any of what’s been going on in my head, JUST JOINED A SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING TEAM!

Which means I have a spy to help me with my research. Isn’t that fun?!

So here’s to writer’s magic, left turns, and my new friend Esther Williams!

Catching up

September 6th, 2018

Hi there! Remember me? Oh my, what a whirlwind spring and summer I’ve had! I’ve been writing writing writing, mostly. I’m working on a new Pumpkin Falls mystery featuring the one and only Truly Lovejoy. Anyway, I spent the past week on a “staycation” from my day job, coffee-shop-hopping around Boston with my laptop in search of the perfect writing spot. I love writing in coffee shops! It’s a nice change from working at home alone. Anyway, I thought I’d share my favorite spots for decaf mochas, my current motivator of choice.

The winner is …


BURDICK’S!  Oh my goodness. I knew their hot chocolate was a winner, but the mochas? Swoon. Unbelievably rich, with just the right balance of chocolate and coffee. I love the fact, too, that this outpost is just a few blocks from the Boston Public Library, which is one of my favorite writing haunts.

Coming in at second place is Tatte (rhymes with “latte”), which is like a little slice of Paris here in Beantown.

Seriously – I dare you to resist something this gorgeously creamy! And they have amazing baked goods which I try hard to resist but usually can’t. Fortunately, they offer teeny tiny cookies at the checkout (so smart of them), so I can indulge in a wee treat without ending up not fitting into my pants.

(And yes, there is a mermaid on my laptop screen — I use Scrivener, which let’s you customize the “Composition mode” backdrop. There’s a mermaid element in my new book….)

In third place is Athan’s.

A European-style bakery with delectable hot chocolate and very good mochas. I like the casual buzz, too. You can often find me here.

Finally, a newly-opened neighborhood hangout: Cafe Landwer.

It’s been around since 1919 (not in my neighborhood), and in fact my favorite drink on their menu right now is a tea called “Berlin 1919” — Berlin, Germany, is where the cafe has its roots. It’s served with cinnamon and lemongrass and mint and a slice of orange and is HIGHLY ADDICTIVE! BUT there is something on the menu that is also calling my name and which I intend to try very soon: NUTELLA LATTE.

Are you kidding me?

Sign me up. I’ve been resisting (see: importance of fitting in pants, above), but I have a feeling I’m going to cave this weekend. I’ll check back in and let you know how it was…

What are your favorite places to write? Or read, or daydream, or draw, or whatever it is you love to do?

 

In the Spotlight: Susan Fletcher

November 10th, 2014

As many of you know, I’ve started a new occasional feature on my blog — a series of author interviews called In the Spotlight. I have so many friends who are writing so many amazing, wonderful,  stellar books, books that you simply MUST know about and read, that I decided it’s time I got busy and shared them with all of you!

Stepping into the spotlight today is my friend Susan Fletcher. Talented, warm, generous with her time and her wisdom, Susan is one of the loveliest people I know. She teaches in the MFA in Writing for Children & Young Adults program at Vermont College, and all I can say is, her students are incredibly lucky to have her. She’s a gem.

Susan Fletcher

Susan Fletcher

I have to tell you a funny story about Susan. Years ago, when I published my first book, the writing community in Portland, Oregon, where I live–and in particular those who write for young readers–welcomed me so kindly. Susan was one of those who did, and I’ve always been grateful to her for it. I was a fan long before we were friends, so it’s been doubly fun to get to know her over the years since. She’s a member of my Soup & Solidarity group (which you can read about by clicking here), and I also get together regularly with her and with two other writer friends at a coffee shop, where we all work on our individual WIPs (that stands for “work in progress”). And OK, maybe we talk a little, too…

Writing is solitary work. It helps to have friends!

Back to the funny story. So all those years ago, when I first got to know Susan, I was bubbling over to my family at dinner one night about how nice she was, and how kind she’d been to newbie me. My son Ben, who was in about fifth grade at the time, looked at me in awe. “You know Susan Fletcher?” he said, his eyes widening. “I love her books!”

It’s true, he had read and adored her DRAGON CHRONICLES series, and I was a rock star by association! So thank you, Susan, for helping me impress my son!

Pull up a chair as we settle in for a visit, and talk with Susan about writing, her book FALCON IN THE GLASS, which is now available in paperback, and what’s next.

falcon_glass

Renaissance Venice, the art of glassblowing, intrigue, and a hint of fantasy – FALCON IN THE GLASS is such a richly imagined world. Can you tell us a bit about the book’s inception, and how the ideas developed as you shaped the book?

I guess you could say I owe FALCON IN THE GLASS to a nasty cold, but that would be flip, and I would never be flip—you know that, don’t you, Heather? Well, in any case, about twenty years ago I had this cold, and it was bad, and I wrapped myself up in a blanket and turned on the TV, just to give my mind something do to, because it hurt too much to read or think. And there was Venice, Italy on the screen—a video documentary. Honestly, it was just pictures and music, but I forgot all about my cold and became obsessed. Venice!

Well, it wasn’t a throw-it-all-away-and-join-the-circus kind of obsession, but ever since that documentary I wanted to find out whatever I could about Venice. I think it’s partly that it’s so stunningly beautiful, and when you wander through those old streets and canals you can almost imagine that the 21st century has dropped away and you’re living in the Renaissance, except with tourists. It’s partly that Venice is built on an archipelago of a hundred-some natural islands, connected by a network of canals and little bridges. And all of those ancient buildings are supported by wooden pilings driven deep in the mud hundreds of years ago. You don’t find that in, like, Nebraska. And it’s also partly that Venice is, you know, sinking, and you know it’s not going to be around forever. And I think this sort of connects on a deep level to the sinkingness of everything beautiful in life.

Wait! I mean, I don’t want to be maudlin but… Everything beautiful is temporary, yes? And that’s part of what makes it precious. And Venice reminds me of this in a piercing way that has haunted me for years.

Here’s something I found out in all the reading I was doing: During the Renaissance the authorities in Venice imposed fines, banishment or prison sentences on glass artisans who took the secrets of their craft outside of the Venetian lagoon. According to some historians it was even worse than that: If a glassmaker went to another country, professional assassins would seek him out, wherever he was, and kill him.

Yikes.

But wow. The makings of a story, I thought. And why couldn’t I be the one to write it?

In your body of work, you’ve written from both female and male points of view. Can you talk about how you choose the protagonists that you do, and the challenges (if there are any) of writing from a male POV, such as Renzo in FALCON IN THE GLASS?

Each of my first eight novels was told from a girl’s point of view. Well, in ANCIENT, STRANGE, AND LOVELY I sort of branched out and had chapters from the points of view of like a truckload of characters. But even in that book it’s clear who the main character is, and she is a girl.

I mean, this is not difficult to explain, right? I am a woman; I was a girl. This is familiar territory. However, I love historical settings; I tend to have protagonists who travel, get into scrapes, and have adventures. There were times, in a number of my books, when I thought to myself: Realistically, in these historical times, it would be almost impossible for a girl to do this and get away with it. And so in some cases my girl protagonists disguise themselves as boys. At least for a while.

And, you know, readers have noticed that the girl-disguised-as-a-boy thing happens a lot in kid’s books, and it does, but I’ll bet that in some historical eras this was going on all the time. There are documented instances of girls passing themselves off as boys in the Civil War, for instance. I’ll bet this happened throughout history way more than we’ll ever know, either because the girls managed to keep their secrets, or because they were not considered historically important.

In any case, my first thought was that the glassblower would be a girl. But historically, though some girls painted glass vessels, it would have been almost unheard of to have a girl working side by side with men in a Murano glass factory during the Renaissance. So I took a deep breath and decided to inhabit a boy, for once.

I was kind of nervous about this, and it’s probably good that Renzo isn’t an older teenage boy, which might have been more challenging. But in my girl-protagonist novels, there were often absent mothers and substitute mother figures—a number of female characters who helped each protagonist define what kind of woman she wanted to become. And I found the same sort of thing happening with fathers and father figures when I was writing about Renzo. There are three father figures in this book—Renzo’s absent father, the master glassblower who was Renzo’s boss, and the woodworker who comes to court Renzo’s mother. And so I was able to explore three different perspectives about what it is to be a man. I was imagining, yes? But that’s what writers do!

Renzo’s desire to create beauty, and his devotion to learning his craft – to “making” – with its pull toward perfection — I can’t help but see parallels to the writer’s own creative process here. Could you talk about that?

Well, there’s the whole write-what-you-know advice, which I usually totally ignore (except when it comes to girl protagonists). Jane Resh Thomas once advised writers not to “write what you know,” but to “write what haunts you.” I like that much better. I write out of my own sense of what it is to be a human being, but I get these obsessions about different times and places, and I want to go exploring.

However, while noodling around in the early stages of writing FALCON IN THE GLASS it occurred to me that I spend the bulk of my days thinking about, teaching about, writing about, and in the act of attempting to create something original and harmonious—a novel. And I thought it might be interesting to write about creating things—something in my personal experience.

So, part of learning to create things well is just practice—putting in your time, keeping at it, refusing to give up when you make mistakes, which you are going to do a lot. Nowadays, people are calling the willingness to persist like this: grit. And yet there is another aspect to this business of creating things—call it joy, or inspiration, or magic, or whatever. And this part has very little to do with stiffening your spine and pushing past difficulties. So, in Falcon, I tried to evoke that delicate balancing act of grit and magic.

The bird kenners. You’ve returned to them repeatedly over the decades, most recently with Bryn in ANCIENT, STRANGE, AND LOVELY, and now Letta and her flock in FALCON IN THE GLASS. Where did they come from originally? And what draws you to revisit them in your stories?

The bird kenners came out of my Dragon Chronicles series; in those books, people who can speak telepathically with dragons can also “ken” with birds. In the last novel in the series, ANCIENT, STRANGE, AND LOVELY, I brought the bird kenners into an alternate 21st century. I began to wonder what they had been doing in all that time between the medieval world of the earlier books and the near-future of ANCIENT, STRANGE, AND LOVELY. It occurred to me that, because they are different, the bird kenners would likely have been persecuted at one time or another. That’s just what happens historically to people who are perceived as different. Maybe they would have been forced to move from one place to another. Also, there’s a kind of neither-here-nor-thereness to the magic of the bird kenners. I mean, there are horse whisperers in real life; why couldn’t there be, like, bird whisperers, too? One of thing that makes me want to spend time in my imagination with the bird kenners is that I can almost believe they might exist for real.

Let’s talk research! We’re kindred spirits in this department – I know we both love this part of the process. Rumor has it that you have a couple of great stories to share, one involving a dungeon, and another the zoo?

Yeah, I tend to go crazy with research. I went to Iran to research ALPHABET OF DREAMS; I wanted to walk along the Silk Road, the path that my characters would have traveled 2000 years ago. Once there, I found all kinds of things I didn’t even know I was looking for. With FALCON IN THE GLASS I spent days meandering through the streets and alleys of Venice and Murano. I soaked up so much from just being there…but when you’re doing research, not everything works out as well as you might hope.

For instance, I toured the old dungeon in Venice, which is incredibly atmospheric—the ancient stone cells, the echoes, the chill… I loved having experienced the dungeon, and I thought this meant that my research on the dungeon was done. However, after I came home and got deeper into the story, I discovered that the dungeon I had visited wasn’t yet built at the time of my story! Gah! So I was going to have to do book research, after all.

With the generous help of a historian (Patricia Fortini Brown of Princeton) and a librarian (Jim Nolte of Vermont College), I found pictures and descriptions of the earlier prisons, some of which were in “the leads,” chambers just beneath the lead roof of the Doge’s Palace. As it turns out, Casanova, the famous womanizer, escaped from “the leads” in one of his many misadventures. And, lucky for me, he described the entire complex of prisons in great detail when recounting the story in his memoir, The Story of My Life.

And I’m not ready to talk too much about my current project yet, but I will say that a couple of weeks ago, for research, I went “backstage” at the zoo and stood between two polar bears—about a foot from each of them—and watched a 1500-pound critter lip a grape from a keeper’s open palm. Wow!

Anything else you’d like to share with us?  How about tips and encouragement for young writers?

One of the questions I get most often from serious young writers has to do with finishing things. So often kids tell me that they begin a story, and it’s just going along great, but partway through they lose steam, and then the story just seems to shrivel up and die on them.

I have two responses to this question. The first has to do with desire and with trouble. I think that a protagonist who really wants something will keep a story going strong—so long as she doesn’t get what she wants—at least, not until the end of the book. So long as she keeps encountering obstacles and trouble. So sometimes I tell young readers to make sure their hero has some unfulfilled desire, and throw in some more trouble, and see if that doesn’t get the story perking along.

But I also want to say that if you have tried this, and you’re still just stuck… It’s okay to let the story go. You don’t have to feel that you have to finish everything you start, especially if you’re writing just for fun—which you should be doing. It should be fun! But sometimes you outgrow a story, and that’s fine. If you’re still struggling with the same story you started two years ago, try something new. Maybe years later you will return to the story with a new perspective that shows you where to go. I would say that when you’re young, follow your interest and your passion, and don’t worry so much about finishing.

See? Didn’t I tell you all she’s amazing? Thanks so much, Susan, for visiting with us today.  Now everybody go visit her website for more fun facts (click here), then buy her books and READ THEM!

 

 

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